Tuesday, 11 April 2017 14:46

AFGA volunteers ensure a smooth migration of Antelope

Written by Michael Short
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Volunteers planning the day's work at a local farm yard Volunteers planning the day's work at a local farm yard

Pronghorn antelope reach their northern-most distribution in Alberta and are known to conduct annual migrations averaging hundreds of kilometres — often passing through narrow passages en-route to key seasonal ranges.

A lone antelope investigating what the fencing crew is up to

Migratory corridors are critically important in ensuring pronghorn remain at sustainable populations. Several documented accounts describe mass mortalities because of barriers to movement. Fences, in particular, are known to create great difficulties for pronghorn as they are unwilling to jump over them. As lower strands are generally 12”-14” above ground, crawling under often results in serious scrapes that can significantly impact the antelope’s health. The migration corridor enhancement will remedy this situation by replacing lower barbed wire strands with smooth wire and at the same time raising them to a height easily navigable by the pronghorn.

Long viewed as an iconic landmark of the prairie landscape the barbed wire fence is getting a make over thanks to groups like the AFGA and ACA
Long viewed as an iconic landmark of the prairie landscape the barbed wire fence is getting a make over thanks to groups like the AFGA and ACA

As you will see in this story, the volunteers out to help these animals move across the landscape bridge the gap between hunters and non-hunters.

Video Story

For more information on the Antelope migratory corridors please check out the Alberta Fish and Game Association.

 

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