Wednesday, 06 October 2021 15:22

Arctic Grayling survey day on Dismal Creek — the heartbeat of the Upper Pembina River

Written by Michael Short
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A large arctic grayling caught on Dismal Creek - part of an assortment of fish sizes caught in a recent creel survey A large arctic grayling caught on Dismal Creek - part of an assortment of fish sizes caught in a recent creel survey Michael Short, Let's Go Outdoors

In this video I look at the Arctic Grayling recovery in the Upper Pembina River. I'm spending the day on Dismal Creek — the largest, and most resilient Pembina River tributary.  Located upstream of Lodgepole, Alberta, the Upper Pembina watershed has been closed to angling for a rest and recovery period since 2016.

A steady decline in Grayling numbers has been recorded since the 1970s — a time period when it took one-hour of angling to catch one to three fish. In 2014 anglers would have to invest 25-hours to net one fish. Nearly six years since the implementation of the rest and recovery period, there are positive signs of recovery — but the question is when will the population be sustainable for anglers to return to the Upper Pembina River and its tributaries.


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